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Wedding dress business wound up after investigation 16 December 2013

Wedding dress company Edressesglobal UK Co Ltd has been wound up in the High Court for filing misleading accounts and giving false trading addresses to customers.

The business, which operated from China and the US, although it was registered in the UK, made dresses in China and targeted customers in the UK, France, Germany, Italy and Australia by marketing on a number of websites.

The investigation by the Insolvency Service was prompted by a reported lack of presence at the addresses listed online in Portsmouth or Park Royal in North London, at which returns or refunds for faulty goods could be made.

A Facebook campaign set up to criticise its activities hinted that Edresses experienced substantial trading throughout 2012, according to the Insolvency Service.

The campaign had 546 members, several of whom experienced “excessively long” waits for their orders or had not received them altogether.

Through the use of a “live chat” service, these members managed to communicate with company employees who confirmed that customers were dealing with Edresses and that the return address for faulty garments was in Park Royal.

However, the company filed dormant accounts as a non-trading company for the period ending 30 November 2012, and failed to produce any accounting records during the investigation.

Current director Tao Zhang, whose address is in San Francisco, and former director Wei Pang, who resides in Shanghai City failed to respond to queries by the Insolvency Service.

The company also failed to comply with the investigation as all emails, letters and live chat messages went unanswered.

David Hill, an investigations supervisor at the Insolvency Service, said: “Edresses took advantage of people looking for dresses for important and significant occasions in their lives but rarely delivered the goods, and winding it up protects the public from losing more money in this way.”

 

 

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